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20121027
20121104
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lot did not take in end. under the law, if you did not file a complaint with the government within six months of the first discriminatory paycheck she got decades before, if she did not file a complaint, whether she knew about it or not, within six months of the first is the mandatory paycheck, -- first discriminatory paycheck, that employer was home free. it could pay her less every paycheck from then on. open and explicitly. there was nothing she could do about it except leave the job. that is what the supreme court said congress meant when it passed these laws prohibiting pay discrimination. it was a vigorous dissent from justice and ruth bader ginsberg that this made no sense whatsoever. she was joined by three other justices. first of all, who knowsafter six months that you pay is less -- second, if you know and you have enough of evidence, are you going to file a complaint within six months of the paycheck? are you going to figure, ok,i will prove my work and not be labeled as a troublemaker. it basically took that decision in what have some called a technicality and took away wo
spokesman. republican policies that have been being pushed by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, demagogued as racist, racist, racist, and when nixon says "law and order" we know what he's talking about. no law and order policies instituted by reagan and bush judges, rudy guiliani, bless his souls, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was reformed, black lives were saved in a different way. welfare and law and order were so successful, bill clinton claimed credit for both. [laughter] we had 12 years of paradise, that's in the chapter, post-oj pair dice describing wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on egg shells anymore with the list of words you just mentioned. people had to be worried back then you would innocently say a word that would be deemed racist. you would ruin your career. you would be -- you would be hated by all of human kind. that was over after oj. a lot of the change after oj was really very subtle, but it was a wonderful thing that happenedded for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long
designed to collect possible automation in a way that can scrub the laws. so you have these distinctions between methods and the missions of wikileaks versus traditional press such that if the government decides to bring a case in wikileaks i have some confidence that the rest of the press will not be chilled. but, obviously that is a tough line to draw. and it is getting tougher and tougher with more immediate, more news being disseminated by sort of these alternative routes , bloggers and the like. >> so let's do one more question here and then we will take some from the audience and a couple of minutes. so picking up, again, on the judge's comments about -- about some extent of over classification or misclassification and also on cans discussion of the hard issues that are posed by the legitimate was a blow or, the person who legitimately is motivated to disclose some kind of wrongdoing. i once asked about something that we hear a lot in cases about discovery in civil lawsuits. not so much. the idea that, perhaps, something is government conduct is arguably unlawful in some respects,
parenthood. it didn't become law, and the government didn't shut down. you didn't have to -- >> moderator: gentlemen, i guess let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking of taking up later, but since it's on the table, congressman dold, your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes you did not break with your leaders even once, and that led the tea party to pull congress to the fringe. what is your response? dold: that was, actually, 24 votes. 20% of those votes pass with the the democratic majority. ten of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times
and biofuels. either in the law and started researching and i said what about cannabis. she said best there is. magnitudes better than corn or slowly and i said but? don't you know? we are not even allowed to talk about it. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. conservative political pundit ann coulter presents her thoughts on race in america next on booktv. the author speaks at the four seasons hotel in los angeles for 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for bringing ancient history, elbow to elbow. that is the key as everyone knows. it is an honor to be here. trivial information. forget it when you are out the door. it is an honor to be here. having been an actor simon recovered actors who is now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the club and all the statement has done to create the first oasis in the desert that is hollywood. thank you for that. really appreciate it. [applause] deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david did. you were magnificent on all the news channels exposing the travesty of the current a
district alone that means cuts of a billion dollars for our seniors. this law was not well thought out. it was not bipartisan but it was very partisan approach to health care reform transit do you have another plan? buerkle: yes, we do. >> maybe we can get to that with our follow-up question you. this is about medicare. as the population ages, the current cost projections for medicare our financial and sustainable the nation. so which of the several floated plans out there to put medicare on stronger financial footing do you support and why? we will begin with dan maffei. maffei: it's extremely important we save medicare, as a guaranteed benefit. the wait is now. not just for today's generation but for future generations to ann marie buerkle says if you're over 55 don't worry. there's real reasons why you should worry. if you're under 55 you better watch out because she wants to change it. the ryan budget should vote for makes into the voucher program. that's one way to handle it but there are other ways. medicare needs some adjustments but fundamentally it's a program that works. what
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
to their name. that is by law. so it's very easy to target black voters. now, as it turns out i started going through these names. i will give you one name, okay? from in the book here where i show you the actual purge list in "billionaires & ballot bandits." there is a mr. robert moore convicted of a felony crime and so all the black robert moore's in florida lost their. there are a few in florida but not only robert moore's from florida but brought moore, bobby more's they said these were covers for for the spell in trying to, including mrs. bobby moore. mr. moore gets convicted of a crime and mrs. bobby moore loses her vote but they got thing -- one thing right. she is b. al: a and by the way when i say she is, this is not from kathryn harrison's list. this is from a current list used by the state of florida, in which every single voter on this list, everyone, no exception, their only crime is voting while black. we can't find -- "the new york times" took four years to pick up the story for me, for years and it was on top of the bbc nightly news and they said the list was flawed. no, it's
by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, but they were demagogue is racist, racist, racist. when nixon says law and order we know what is really talking about. instituted by bye bye reagan-bush judges and rudy giuliani, bless his soul from new york city, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was finally reformed tens of thousands of black lives were saved in a different way. welfare was so successful in law and order bills were so successful they were claiming credit for both. so we had 12 years of paradise within the chapter, post-o.j. paradise and many wonderful things that happened. most of all people were not walking on egg shells anymore. add to the list of words you just mentioned. people would worry about that you would innocently say a word and it he would ruin your career and you would be hated by all of humankind. that was over after oj and a lot of the change after oj was very subtle but it was a wonderful thing that happened for race relations in america. that faded, it happened a long time ago and along comes barack obama the most li
. >> it'd be pretty difficult for him to actually repeal the healthcare law within 24 hours. he would need to go to congress and we'd still have to wait and see if republicans are in control of the senate or the house. >> sarah kliff covers healthcare issues for the washington post. while she says democratic control of the senate would throw a wrench into romney's plans, there are immediate steps a romney administration could take to start to undo obama's signature piece of legislation. >> one option the romney administration could pursue is not offering funds to the various departments that are supposed to implement the health care law. that could really slow down and make it very difficult to implement the law even if it were left standing as a law. >> for all the rancor surrounding the legislation, the percentage of americans with medical insurance has barely budged since the law was passed 31 months ago. according to the census an estimated 84.3 percent of americans had medical insurance last year compared to 83.7 percent the year before. because of the legislation, a few million young
training from here in the united states. i lead a rule law forum back to the states last january. all aimed at assisting the judicial system. as the saudi system has moved out on a number of areas, we have supported their efforts. in yemen, saudi arabia played a significant role in brokering a gcc led political transition agreement. and continue to provide a leadership role in the friends of yemen and support of the government. there have been the last few years a trend toward multilateralism. i say that with some reservation because certainly the gcc and the arab league have been active in the last two years in ways not previously seen. most recently, saudi arabia has pushed the idea of a gcc union patterned after the eu. for secretary clinton's national security operation form. last month in new york, it provides a venue for collaborative securities discussions with all of the gcc nations. but something has changed. it was reflected in the recent summit last august. i spoke with many of and some of them spoke with a different idea in the atmosphere of the meetings. one individual in parti
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
party, the republican party is not a choice on the ballot. with the voter i.d. law, all they want to do is disenfranchise the voter. okay? the republican party but the libertarian party through hell, to be honest with you. just to get 1% of the boat off the ballot. -- of the vote off. the libertarian party never got more than 1% of the votes nationally and i think it's ridiculous. i have volunteered for the libertarian party. they were arguing over signatures. what a waste of time and taxpayers' money because that had to all go in to the courts. host: terry madonna, third parties and the pennsylvania ballot. guest: gary johnson will be on the ballot house will -- as will jill stein of the green party. pennsylvania can write someone in. we will essentially have four two choices. host: the headline this morning from "the philadelphia inquirer ." joining us is the politics writer from "the enquirer." thank you for being with us. share with us these polling numbers. how many did you survey and what are the results? caller: it was a survey of 600 likely voters all last week, tuesday through
, corporations, unions, other associations, not permitted to make contributions. that has been the law for more than 40 years. they are allowed to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to put cannot make such a patient. typically, presidential candidates raise money at the maximum level, they are well known nationally, lots of wealthy individuals and groups that want to support them. the obama campaign stands out in that respect of it. it is also importantthan 40 yea. they are allowed to spend their own to note, the caller is making another race has been more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money, about 60% of the outside money, has been raised from about 200 individuals. the number of people you could fit on an airplane have respecta small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money
, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals further charges leveled yesterday. today, i want to tell you something about my world with the realities of running an institution the size and scope of penn state while dealing with widely divergent perceptions. i want to share the many wonderful activities and accomplishments of the students and faculty and staff over this agonizing year. by any reasonable definition, they are newsworthy stories. i understand that you may not be willing to listen to them until we show you how this year has changed us. what we learned about ourselves and what are we trying to do with that knowledge? i will speak candidly about how the last year affected penn state, and how the impact has gone beyond central pennsylvania to shape policies at colleges and universities across the nation. i'll share our strategies for the ye
-- to asia had the most liberal family status law in the arab world since 1956, and after the revolution, islamists tried to change that, and it seems they've had at least partial success. >> who is responsible for this radical turn? >> the country is a lot more democratic, but nobody should have expected that everything would work smoothly, and tunisia would be a western-style democracy in a couple of years. tunisian society is highly divided, and we only saw the relatively liberal in the capital, but most of the population is extremely conservative. they have voted the islamists into office with about 35% of the vote, and now, they are under pressure of it even more conservative and radical elements. >> how much power to the religious extremists have in tunisia, and what's the danger the power could fall into their hands? >> they are not a strong -- as strong as in egypt. the islamists are strong, and they're right wing is relatively close in its opposite -- close in its positions on this issue to the extremists, but in general, the country is divided, but most of the larger political
. >> oh, yes they change the law and make the crimes legal. this is what obama understood in april of '08. he nailed it. he said these guys changed the rules of the game. allowed them to operate by like bandits, and it was done under george w. bush's watch. there isn't difference between romney and bush. >> that raises the critical question. why doesn't the romney campaign say look at the parallel of george w. bush it seems to be a winning argument. >> and it's an accurate one. we lost the populous in obama. interest is no spirit there. there is no guts. that's why he lost the first debate. he's not feeling our pain. the pain is very widespread. if you lost your house 50 million americans have lost their homes or they're going to lose it. they have to change neighbors give up schools. their kids think they're losers. they did something wrong. this guy is not addressing this. >> eliot: was he more akin to the plutocats that you write so persuasively about in your book. >> i think by invocation and personality he's a techno contract. he could be member of the plutocats if he wanted to. that
to do what? last i checked, administer laws passed by congress. i think there's an open question whether they are doing that consistently across the board whether it's an energy space, environmental space, ect.. it's our job as attorneys general to participate in that transaction is preserved. that's why we filed a lawsuit. we'll see where it heads. it's less about the tax breaks for those corporations. it's more about what responsibility and opportunity has been vested in the state by the affordable care act in preserving that as a stake holder. >> i'm lee parsely with outside lawyer protection for lawsuit reform. in texas, there's a number of statutes that allow attorney general to have multiple violations. for a company that has inadvertently vollied the statute multiple times, those penalties can be substantial. at least philosophically, we've become concerned with that. do y'all have similar statutes in your state? is that an issue that we ought to have on the radar for those of us who are supporting the business community and their concerns about litigation? >> i can take that. tha
on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the recount laws in the state of new hampshire. is it possible that there could be a recount in this state and what are the rules for that? guest: we have specific rules for the state. we have a fine secretary of state, bill gardner, quite experienced in this. he's the person who has been the keeper of the flame for the new hampshire primary. we had a famous account here in the late '70's with senator john durken who recently passed away. frankly, i don't see it coming down to that. we will see what happens on tuesday. i think other states may be more likely to have a recount and new hampshire. host: do you have voter id laws? guest: yes, and there's some controversy. the legislature passed a voter -- a new voter law that required people to swear that if there were going to vote in a certain town that they would pay their taxes and their registration fees for their cars in that town, etc. this was appealed and the state supreme court has put that on hold. right now some of our voters are slightly confused about those issues going into tuesday. ho
democrat voted against and did not become law and the government did not shut down. >> moderator: gentlemen let me jump ahead to a topic i was thinking about taking up a little later but since it's on the table congressman's dold your opponent says that on the 20 most important votes he did not break with your leaders even want once and not let the tea party to pull congress to the friends. what is your response to that? dold: my response is that was 24 votes if "the washington post" is correct. 24 this was passed with the majority and 10 of those votes danny hoyer voted with but do you know what's interesting about those votes? not a single vote talks about health care or the environment and not a single vote talks about transportation infrastructure. not a single one of those votes were dealing with education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the tenth district and i think are critical votes get my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. schneider: if you look at the
on shore about 30 miles from rehoboth to, in new jersey. my state, where my in-laws used to live, where my brothers and sisters live, they were hit pretty badly. i have a sister in law and family who live in ocean city, new jersey. you saw how badly they were hit. it is kind of amazing -- it is kind of amazing. a call yesterday with all the governors and mayors, it warmed my heart. you had the governor of delaware, the governor of connecticut, the governor of pennsylvania, democrats and republicans, and they were hurt. the governor of maryland. all saying to new jersey and new york -- look, if you need extra resources, we will send you ours. we will send you hours. listen on the telephone, hearing the mayor of the big city, not only mayor bloomberg, who is one hell of a fine guy, mayor bloomberg of new york. mayor booker of newark, hoboken -- hear these guys talking, they are all offering each other help. offering each other help. democrats and republicans, acting like democrats and republicans are supposed to act. [applause] ladies and gentlemen. we are always, i know this sounds almost t
saturday night. make no mistake, democrats have been fighting successfully against unfair voter i.d. laws and purged lists. but the threat remains, some voting advocates expect a record number of voter challenges. the best advice, vote anyway. don't get bullied at the polls, and don't give up. i'm joined tonight by ohio state senator nina turner, also with us tonight is judith brown dianis, the co-director of the advancement project. judith, let me ask you first, what is the biggest threat at the polls as you see it right now? >> sure. well, thanks for having me, ed. we have moved from politicians who have tried to manipulate the laws to restrict the vote to now these partisan operatives. you know, in ohio you have husted, the secretary of state, who has been on a relentless effort to restrict the vote, who now admits there has been a glitch in the computer system. 33,000 people who registered have not found themselves on the rolls and cannot get their absentee ballots. it is a glitch. then you have true the vote, organizations that say that they're about election integrity who are prepar
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
? they passed a law to change the system. we say, here are the people who qualify and the yget the loans at a lower interest rate. every student in the country who gets one of these loans will have the right to pay it back as a low, fixed percent of their income for 20 years. now, think about this. what that means is, nobody ever has to drop out of college because theyr'e scared of b orrowing more money. if you get out and want to teach in a small town in rural ohio -- you can do it anyway. what you have to pay will be determined by what you're making. not the other way around. and believe it or not, here's the kicker. this, over 10 years, costs you $60 billion less than the old system. so -- the president and the congress allocated that to increasing pell grands every year for a decade and to maintaining the tuition tax credit to pay the way through college. this is unbelievable. now, here's what you need to know. even the more moderate immage of governor romney cannot obscure the fact he has committed to repealing that law. he wants to give -- i'm telling you. idiology over evidence. t
of issues with law enforcement, particularly the issue of creating a funnel for narcotics trafficking within 5 miles of the new mexico border. there are hundreds of new mexicans who have signed petitions that saying, please do not do this. you are ignoring them. you are not going to find a solution that way. >> let's move on to the next question. >> in 2007, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators reached a tentative compromise on immigration reform. but even with president bush's support, the compromise collapsed. most agree we need immigration reform. what reforms do yoou support? and how would you get the senate to approve immigration reform when such a bipartisan group could not? representative wilson. >> it is separate from border security. the united states has to have effective control of our borders. the number of people crossing the border illegally has gone down because of the resources that we put in there since 2005. that is a good thing. the people who are still crossing tend to be heavily armed narco traffickers and human traffickers. it's very dangerous. with respect to immigratio
the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. and need to get my car fixed? progressive makes it easy, because we give you choices. you can pick where to get your car fixed, we can cut you a check, or, at our service center, we take care of everything for you. [ relaxing music playing ] [ chuckles ] -whew, so many choices. -take your time. -the service center. -okay. giving you choices -- now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for staying with us. if you're not worried about the election tonight, this story might change your mind a little bit. voter suppression tactics are ramping up. the advancement project reports ohio secretary of state purged 6,000 names from the voter rolls, 38% of the voters turned out to be legitimate. it is not clear why those voters were singled out. we don't know if they'll get to cast a regular ballot on tuesday either. here's another problem for ohio voters. hu
nobody speaks about the intelligence blunder the republicans did that put us in a war with raq, law 2000 american soldiers, and their answer was they had poor intelligence. secondly, my question is, why should anybody believe that governor romney would be good at creating jobs what he was 48 in job guest: well, i'll take the question first. governor romney in the middle oh f a tough economy created almost 50,000 new jobs in massachusetts. let's remember. >> on "washington journal" tomorrow morning we'll look at virge. >> now we'll go to jacksonville florida where mitt romney is to speak shortly. he is with jeb bush. >> you ready to take back the white house? i thought you might be. how did you enjoy five for fighting? he's a really good guy. did you enjoy his song "freedom never cries"? this is an important election. this an election about what the future of america is going to be. is our future going to be more debt and more regulation and more taxes? sor our future going to be in less taxes, less regulations and. nibble mitt romney. he's the right candidate at the right time to be
, is on the better loss for adoption. -- better laws for adoption. we should encourage adoption in the united states of america with federal laws here in the state capital. and taxpayer funding of abortion -- our tax dollars should be used to fund medicare, and social security. and funding the military. they should not be used to fund abortions. sherrod brown is an extremist on the issue and supports using your tax dollars to fund abortion. we should not support abortions in the ninth month of pregnancy. but sheriff brown has an extremist position. can you explain to the people watching at home tonight, why do you support abortion in the ninth month of pregnancy. >> i have never heard anyone say that to me, judge. unlike judge mandel, -- josh. unlike josh mandel, my opponent has an extreme position and signed the exceptions for anything, rape and incest. i trust women to make decisions about their own health care. there are tens of thousands of women who get pregnant from rapes every year. it may not be something we want to acknowledged in the end, i will trust of high women to make -- i will trust
th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years because what you have to pay will be determined by what you are making, not the other way around. [cheers and applause] believe it or not, over 10 years this cost you $6 billion less than the old system. -- $60 billion less than the old system. the president and congress allocated at $60 million to increasing the pell grants every year for a decade to keep up with inflation and maintaining the tuition tax credits for middle-class families to help pay their kids way through college. this is unbelievable. here is wh
in giving back. we have done that you are life. my husband is in law enforcement. for many years i was an investigative reporter and fought public corruption. i spent the last 10 years of my career in health care, making sure it is accessible and we offer quality health care. this election will get down to parties i see this is a different set of priorities from where my husband and i come from and from what congressman schilling stands for. i pledge to give it my all and work on behalf of the middle class families that have been under attack by the last two years of congressman schilling's tenure. we have to make sure progress are there for students to go to college and the balance the budget with the right parity. not on the backs of the middle class but with the middle-class in mind. thank you very much. >> now it is time for questions from the panelists. >> welcome to both candidates tonight. congressman schilling, you are from colona and ms. bustos, from east moline/ those cities are 7 miles apart yet members will have to represent a district that is over 85 miles wide. how wo
contributions. that's been the law for more than 40 years and it still is. they're about to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to but they can't make contributions. presidential candidates raise money at the national level. -- a maximum levels. there are a loft of wealthy individuals who support them. so the obama campaign stands out in that respect a little bit. the caller is making another point which is that the money in this race this year has been much more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. the attention in this spending is focused on a small number of people who have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that gets you to a majority of the money -- about 60% of the outside money has been raced from about 200 individuals. so the number of people you could fit on an airplane have been an important group in funding these outside efforts this year. and that's different and i think we need to watch to see whether those financial resources can become more important in elections. that's a que
liberation act was passed in 1998 and signed into law by president clinton and supported by many republicans in congress. it had bipartisan support. vice president gore was a supporter, that is why i am not completely convinced that that is a counterfactual point. we have a lot of interest and people were casting around, trying to find solutions. and i do think the initialization of afghanistan was correct, whether that means we need to be there for 10 years or until afghanistan becomes connecticut, that is another matter entirely. but i think the initial strikes against those were necessary and just. but then to go out and pursue regime change, prior to 9/11, they simply casted in search of a solution to a problem with a little class saw. >> libertarianism was fiscally conservative, so we will get back to the middle point. based on what he just said, during the bush years, bush-cheney, the focus was foreign policy. guantÁnamo bay, civil liberties, there is something that animated the hatred on the left. for the right, it wasn't specifically foreign policy and civil liberties. we have a pre
that same-sex couples have to be treated before the eyes of the law as heterosexual couples. he went on to say, what i also said historically is marriages have been defined at the state level. is this next election, when it comes to youth, are they going to look at social issues more or more economic issues? >> i think social issues do mean a great deal to us. when you look at guy marriage as the next civil rights issue of our time. we were seeing if he would take the next step and make it a federal law. when i travel around the country at the end of the day, it is everyone talking about back pocket, money, jobs, employment. >> let's talk about you're talking about pocketbook, talking about economic issues. when you look at the youth vote today, since you've been talking to them, are they more fiscally conservative than perhaps last election, seeing many of them as children of generation x-ers. that generation grew up fiscally challenged and they may have passed some of those ideas to their children. >> that taps into something, yeah. i agree with that. i authentic it explains that w
. today is mother-in-law day and the new study finds that 50% of americans who have mothers-in-law report that they have a good or great relationship with her. how about the 50%? now for the rest of the country's forecast. it will be cooler across the plains and down into texas. some heavy unnamed storms are likely out west. the week ahead looks mostly dryer once sandy has come and gone. next, confronting our superstitions. and later, actor christopher walken. >> my son bought me a cadillac,, >> osgood: a menacing ladder, a black cat. perhaps i'd better knock wood before proceeding. no need to apologize if the approach of halloween makes you extra superstitious. many successful people harbor superstitions aplenty. scientists find superstitions a rich field of study. our cover story is reported by susan spencer of "48 hours." >> announcer: sweeney strikes out swinging. >> reporter: casey dagle pitched in the major leagues. >> announcer: a 3-2 pitch to bonds. he struck him out swinging. >> reporter: his wife jenny finch upon olympic medals in softball. >> announcer: called strike on the out
of the audience, a committee of byu faculty members as well as the byu law school reviewed the questions. they selected those addressing important utah national issues. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. howell will have the first question of the debate, for subsequent questions we'll alternate which candidate answers first. each candidate will then have a minute to answer the question, and both will have an additional 30 seconds for rebuttal. if i determine that a follow-up question is appropriate, each will have 30 seconds to respond to my follow-up yes. the first question is from joseph haywood, a student here at brigham young university. joseph? >> regarding health care, what responsibilities, if any, do you believe rest with state and local governments, and what responsibilities, if any, lay with the federal government? howell: thank you, joseph. you know, health care is a fifth of our gdp right now. i serve on the board of directors for sutter health, the largest not-for-profit health care organization in california. we've known for a long time that we have to have afforda
under the law. and who could be against that? eerly voting ended in maryland tonight but oneof the state's most exppnsive cammaigns is still going strong. going all out in the final - days before the general electionquestion 7 would expand gambling to live taale games...and approve a 6th &pcasino in rince eerge's county.if approved... -g-m resorts would like to build a casinooat nationallharbor (murren) "thii is a way for the state to raise reeenue, without raisiig taxes and create joos, good payinggjobs at a time when maryland needs j. jobs."opponents say....tte opponents saa... the promise - pf nnwjobs... and... more rrvenue... for schhols...is exaggerated. here's... our questionnof he day.wwth thh electionjust days away...have youdecided toovote es on question seven? seven? here's our facebooo page...more than 100 ttis......and there are a lot of you on both sides of his baalot quessiinjoin the discuusion by going to facebook dot om slash fox- baltimore and if ou stilll have queetions regarding the maryland referendums... fox45 will aar a vote 2012 speci
in the -- laws in the state of new hampshire. what are the rules for that? guest: we have a fine secretary of state who is quite experienced in this. he is the person who has been a keeper of the flame for the new hampshire primary. we had a famous 3 count here in the late 1970's with senator john durkin, who recently passed away. i do not see it coming down to that. we will see what happens on tuesday. other states may be more likely to have a recount then you hampshire. host: what about voter i.d. laws? do you have them? guest: >> there is some controversy. the legislature passed a voter law that require people to swear that they would, if they were going to vote in a certain town, that they would pay taxes and registration fees for their cars in the town. this was appealed and the state supreme court has put that on hold. right now, some of our voters are confused about those issues going into tuesday. host: neil levesque is the executive director at st. anselm college cost new hampshire institute of politics. if you would like to join the conversation, the numbers are on your screen. a
is supporting a new law aimed at changing that in california it is call would prop 33. it is on the ballot. how are you? >> i am doing great. >> a lot of controversusy in california. why is prop 33 good for active military folks in california? >> well, here in california, we have what is call would a persistency discount. if you have a autoinsurance with a carrier for a long period of time you get a discount. if that coverage lapses, you lose the discount and it is not portable and you can't take to other companies. if you are in the military and don't need a car in afghanistan, you come back to california, you have lost that discount. prop 33 was written by an army major in large part to help the military by insuring that one, if you are in the military and deploy over seas, you don't lose persistency discount. >> if i miss a payment and deployed over seas, the policy will not be cancel would and i will not lose the discount, that is the point. >> the policy will not be cancelled and you will not lose the discount. it doesn't only benefit the military but we are in tough economic times and you
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